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THOMAS G. EDDY MEMORIAL ANTIQUE TRACTOR PULL

Antique Tractor PullSUNDAY AUGUST 27 - 11:00 a.m.

Sponsored by: Homestead Landscaping

Contact: Dan Kilburn 802-375-3625

Due to increased operating expenses the Bondville Fair will appreciate donations at the time of registration. Thank you.

 

Sled provided by Love's Sled Service

Tractors must be ready for weigh-in by 9:30 A.M.

There will be eight classes of tractors:

  1. 3,000
  2. 3,500    
  3. 4,500
  4. 5,500
  5. 6,500    
  6. 7,500
  7. 8,500
  8. 9,500
  9. Open Class

All participants will pay Fair Gate Fee of $10.00. Admission wristband must be on wrist at time of registration.

  1. Tractors cannot be modified to improve performance and must be stock appearing. Non-standard replacement parts are allowed where factory items are no longer available. Engines must be controlled by a functioning governor.
  2. Tractors must be equipped with wheelie bars and fixed hooking rings.
  3. Governor bypass or over-speeding prohibited.
  4. Maximum height of hitches is 20 inches. Higher hitches will not be allowed.
  5. Drivers are cautioned to exercise extreme care at all times. Tractors are to be in neutral and operatorís hands raised when hooking or unhooking a lot.
  6. In each class trophies will be awarded for First Place.

Rosettes will be awarded for Second through Fourth Places.

Absolutely no alcoholic beverages allowed on or near the track.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the starting weight to be pulled in each class today?

All classes will start at 500 pounds.

What weight, on an average, can a regular tractor pull?

While there are many variables, an average would be ten to fifteen thousand pounds, although some have been known to pull upwards of twenty thousand pounds.

When is a tractor considered "antique"?

All tractors in today's pull are pre-1960 models.

What is the minimum distance the sled must be pulled for a "good pull"?

A good pull must exceed 150 feet.

What is the economic life of a tractor?

Some pre-World War II tractors have lasted over sixty years and are still in use.